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Category — Aeroponics

Yemi Amu’s urban farming concept takes root in the Big Apple

Yemi Amu, director of Oko Farms (Photo courtesy of Harrison Chen)

Some cities like Detroit, Philadelphia and Atlanta have urban ag[riculture] policies that support farmers of color with land access.

By Tony Binns
Rolling Out
October 6, 2020

Excerpt:

Oko Farms is an aquaponics farming and education company in Brooklyn. In 2013, we converted an abandoned lot in East Williamsburg, Brooklyn, into the Oko Farms Aquaponics Education center — NYC’s first outdoor — and only publicly accessible — aquatic farm. We were able to acquire the lot through a partnership with the Brooklyn Economic Development Corporation and GreenThumb NYC.

In addition to growing a wide variety of vegetables and fish, we provide workshops, tours, and support individuals and organizations with setting up their own aquaponics farms.

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October 11, 2020   Comments Off on Yemi Amu’s urban farming concept takes root in the Big Apple

South Africa: Urban farming was the saving grace for an unemployed youth

Mosesi in his hydroponic tube that lies in the heart of the Tembisa township.

Mosesi Mosesi (28) set up an aquaponics farm in the heart of Tembisa, a township on the East Rand of Gauteng

By Noluthando Ngcakani
Food For Mzansi
27th Mar 2020

Excerpt:

His life changed in 2017, when he found out about an opportunity to join a horticulture learnership programme and he jumped at the chance. He was identified as one of three thousand young people to benefit from the Nedbank funded skills development program in partnership with the Youth Employment Service (YES).

During this programme he developed a new fondness for plants. Through the initiative he could also harness his new-found love for agriculture and start his own business.

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April 9, 2020   Comments Off on South Africa: Urban farming was the saving grace for an unemployed youth

Step inside this New Holland hydroponic greenhouse run by volunteers

Must see video.

Don Aldrich and his wife, Lois, have plots in Garden Spot’s community garden to grow their own lettuce, beans, Swiss chard, summer squash and tomatoes.

By Erin Negley
Lancaster Online
Feb 20, 2020

(Must see. Mike)

At this time of year, the community gardens at Garden Spot Village are frozen rectangles of soil.

Inside the greenhouse, however, towers bloom with heads of green lettuce, herbs and tomatoes. Volunteers harvest produce for restaurants on campus and a local food pantry. It’s dirty work, yet the greenhouse crew is so popular, there’s a wait list to join.

The idea for a hydroponic greenhouse sprouted from Garden Spot CEO Steve Lindsey. He was impressed by fresh greens served on a mission trip in Africa, says Juanita Fox, Garden Spot’s story teller. That lettuce came from a hydroponic greenhouse using growing mediums other than soil.

After some research, trials and fundraising, Aero Development Corp. in Gap built the towers for Garden Spot’s own greenhouse.

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February 27, 2020   Comments Off on Step inside this New Holland hydroponic greenhouse run by volunteers

Malaysian paraplegic farmer realises his dream of an aquaponic farm

Dr Tang briefing children about how food is grown at the farm.

The farm currently produces 10,000 plants in a 557sq m green house each month. It has the ability to harvest 189 plants per square metre. It also breeds 250 Australian Jade Perch.

By Majorie Chiew
Star 2
Apr 9, 2019

Excerpt:

He said: “The goal is to supply organic and pesticide-free fresh food directly to nearby communities within a 10km radius.” Tan believes the farm can drive the local economy that is environmentally sustainable.

Lee, too, is hopeful that “the direct supply of fresh greens to nearby communities will stimulate the local economy and reduce the importation of vegetables”.

Lee ventured into aquaculture over 15 years ago. His company was the first to import, breed and introduce the Australian Jade Perch to the Malaysian market. He is involved in a hybrid grouper nursery and also an all-male udang galah (Malaysian fresh giant prawns) hatchery and grow-out operations (breeding from fries to adult size).

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April 16, 2019   Comments Off on Malaysian paraplegic farmer realises his dream of an aquaponic farm

Brazil: You can Farm Anywhere, Even Inside a Shopping Mall

BeGreen, a startup company in Belo Horizonte in Brazil, is producing fresh and organic produce inside the city’s main shopping center.

By Ana-Christina Gaeta
Food Tank
July 23, 2018

Excerpt:

Using aquaponic methods, the farm produces roughly 40,000-60,000 plants per month. Most of these are greens and microgreens including beet leaves, watercress, parsley, coriander, basil, thyme, sage, arugula, radish, mustard, cabbage, and a diverse range of lettuces.

The fish serve as a natural fertilizer for the farm, and they raise over 500 tilapia per month. There are biofilters, which metabolize the fish’s waste to enrich the water used throughout the whole system. The farm uses 90 percent less water than conventional farming and does not use pesticides, significantly lowering their environmental footprint.

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July 28, 2018   Comments Off on Brazil: You can Farm Anywhere, Even Inside a Shopping Mall

Superior Fresh – Largest Aquaponics Facility in the World

Uses LumiGrow LED Grow Lights

LumiGrow Lighting
May 21, 2018

Superior Fresh is the largest aquaponics facility in the world. Their state-of-the-art fish facility is coupled with a 3-acre glass greenhouse where they grow various leafy greens and herbs. They grow everything from seed in their greenhouse under LumiGrow grow lights and produce 1.8 million pounds of leafy greens each year. The leafy vegetables make their journey from the greenhouse to supermarket shelves within 48 hours.

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May 31, 2018   Comments Off on Superior Fresh – Largest Aquaponics Facility in the World

Toledo, Ohio restaurant to open 8,000-square-foot urban indoor aquaponics farm to supply four area restaurants

New location for Balance Pan-Asian Grill to include urban farm. (Source: WTOL)

Mr. Karamchandani said the Balance operation will use tilapia and prawns, and it will grow all types of leafy greens, any type of fruiting vegetable (such as brussel sprouts), all types of peppers, and herbs. Prawns can be harvested for use in Balance menu items, but the chain does not use fish.

By Jon Chavez
Toledo Blade
Oct 12, 2017

Excerpt:

But next to the 2,300 square foot restaurant the owners plan to build an 8,000-square-foot urban indoor aquaponics farm that will grow enough vegetables, fish, and shrimp to supply their soon-to-be four area restaurants.

“We will grow product and 70 percent of it will be used in our restaurants. The rest we will sell to restaurants in town and in Ann Arbor,” said Mr. Karamchandani. “We’re going to pull out a lot, tons of produce once this gets going.”

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October 21, 2017   Comments Off on Toledo, Ohio restaurant to open 8,000-square-foot urban indoor aquaponics farm to supply four area restaurants