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Category — Cooking

What to do with ‘46 pounds of zucchini’? First-time gardeners discover canning

Angie Boehmer and her grandmother Barb with a newly canned jar of pickles she made using her family’s traditional recipe. Courtesy of Angie Boehmer

A revival in the old-time skill has led to a canning supply shortage in Minnesota and across the country

By Jon Collins
Minneapolis MPR News
September 21, 2020

Excerpt:

And it’s sent canning supplies flying off the shelves. Companies that make jars and lids have “experienced unprecedented demand,” which has led to shortages in stores and online, according to a spokesperson for Newell Brands, which owns Ball jars.

The normally dusty canning sections at big-box stores are almost completely bare. It’s even been hard to keep canning supplies on the shelf at the tiny Welna II Hardware and Paint in the Seward neighborhood of Minneapolis. The store is completely out of the typical pint jars, quart jars and wide-mouth lids that canners need to safely do their work, said said store manager Henry Kwant.

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September 26, 2020   Comments Off on What to do with ‘46 pounds of zucchini’? First-time gardeners discover canning

An Imu (an underground oven commonly used in Hawaii) Cooks Turkeys at Maona Community Garden

Chantal Chung cuts banana stalks for the Moana Community Garden Imu on Wednesday. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

Ham goes in. Pork butt joins the party. Yep, chicken is invited, too. And this year, along with an army of turkeys, they’ll all mingle with a whole side of teriyaki moose.

By Max Dible
West Hawaii Today
November 22, 2018

Excerpt:

Chantal Chung employs such a method every year at Maona Community Garden in South Kona, where her holiday tradition is to pay respect to Native Hawaiian cooking by dropping her turkey, and around 50 others, into the ground then covering them all with a big mound of dirt.

That description is more than a little reductive, as it isn’t magic that produced upward of 1,000 pounds of perfectly cooked meat after the volunteer and project manager at the garden excavated a half-ton of holiday goodness around 8 this morning.

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November 24, 2018   Comments Off on An Imu (an underground oven commonly used in Hawaii) Cooks Turkeys at Maona Community Garden

Thailand: Bangkok’s First Urban Farm Restaurant

Haoma is Bangkok’s first modern urban farm based fine dining restaurant. We grow what we cook, we cook what we love.

The kitchen is helmed by Chef DK, Executive chef, and owner assisted by Chef Tarun Bhatia, the current San Pelligrino Young Chef of Asia.

Chef Deepanker can be found here every day, working the soil, planting, weeding and harvesting the finest herbs and vegetables so that his guests can enjoy the freshest ingredients possible.

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April 15, 2018   Comments Off on Thailand: Bangkok’s First Urban Farm Restaurant

KI Urban Agri-Culture Learning Lab in Indianapolis


Communities Creating Change: Our Voice, Our Choice is a campaign to encourage and sustain urban agriculture in the mid-north/northwest area of Indianapolis

Crowdfunding
2017

Excerpt:

KI Urban Agri-Culture Learning Lab: The house we are currently rehabbing will serve as a public space for individuals and groups to learn about and engage in aquaponics, urban gardening and urban farming. Empowering individuals and groups with the knowledge, skills and experience to grow their own food and strengthen/expand their relationships by working together to address a common problem and builds community.

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December 5, 2017   Comments Off on KI Urban Agri-Culture Learning Lab in Indianapolis

Martha Stewart: A Winter Harvest from My Vegetable Greenhouse


Here’s Ryan harvesting some cutting celery, another ingredient of my green juice. This hardy annual can be used in place of celery and is easier to grow. The fine green leaves and thin hollow stems are especially good to flavor soups and stews.

Photos from her food producing greenhouse

Martha Up Close and Personal Blog
Feb 7, 2017

Excerpt:

My expansive outdoor vegetable garden is bare, but I’m fortunate to have lots of wonderful vegetables growing in the ground in a special greenhouse located behind my Equipment Barn. As many of you know, its design was inspired by Eliot Coleman, an expert of four-season farming.

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February 14, 2017   Comments Off on Martha Stewart: A Winter Harvest from My Vegetable Greenhouse

A Slower Pace for TV’s Graham Kerr, ‘Galloping Gourmet’ now 82


Graham Kerr in his garden at home in Mount Vernon, Wash., last summer. Photo Ruth Fremson/The New York Times. Click on image for larger file.

In the 1970s, he lurched from indulgence to a denunciation of excess, but he eventually found his way to a middle ground.

By Kirk Johnson
The New York Times
January 9, 2017

Excerpt:

MOUNT VERNON, Wash. — He injected extra fat into already well-marbled roasts, with a grin and an ever-present glass of wine. He laughed uproariously at his own jokes, and told Americans that cooking at home did not have to be particularly sophisticated or difficult (Julia Child, the only other major TV chef of his era, had pretty much staked out that turf anyway) to be wild, and wildly fun.

But always, Graham Kerr leapt. Decades before Emeril Lagasse shouted “Bam!” in administering a pinch of cayenne or garlic, Mr. Kerr defined the television cook as a man of energy and constant motion — “The Galloping Gourmet,” as his show’s title put it.

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January 17, 2017   Comments Off on A Slower Pace for TV’s Graham Kerr, ‘Galloping Gourmet’ now 82

Why Two California Indian Tribes are Growing Their Own Food, and Why It Isn’t Easy


Watch Tending the Wild: Decolonizing the Diet.

Big Pine Reservation’s Sustainable Foods Program and Bishop Paiute Tribe’s Food Sovereignty Program

By Clarissa Wei
KCET
Nov 21, 2016

Excerpt:

Big Pine Paiute-Shoshone tribe member Joseph Miller shows me around his town’s garden. There are two hoop houses with herbs and fresh heads of lettuce just popping out of the ground. Tomatoes are in abundance, with so many hybrid varieties that it’s hard to keep track.

“What we’re working towards is being able to not only create a sustainable food source, but to create food security,” Miller says. “We want to give our people the right to know without being in the dark and wary about where their food is coming from, or how long it’s been on a truck.”

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November 28, 2016   Comments Off on Why Two California Indian Tribes are Growing Their Own Food, and Why It Isn’t Easy