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Category — Deserts

Singapore: 5 urban vegetable farms to explore with the little ones

Bollywood Veggies

With Singapore’s 30 by 30 mission to start being self-sufficient when it comes to food security, there’s so much focus on local urban farms growing fresh produce.

By Priyanka Elhence
Asia One
December 05, 2020

Excerpt:

Bollywood Veggies

Bollywood Veggies is perhaps one of the oldest, and certainly one of the most famous, local farms in town.

Grown without the use of any chemical fertilisers, pesticides or growth hormones, there’s even over 20 varieties of bananas that are available here.

Sign up for their guided farm tour for hands-on farming experiences, learning methods of sustainable and planet-friendly farming, and of course, tasting fruits and vegetables at their freshest.

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December 11, 2020   Comments Off on Singapore: 5 urban vegetable farms to explore with the little ones

Agritecture Designer is the world’s first digital platform for urban agriculture planning

Today, the firm has completed more than 110 consultations in 26 countries, and has attracted a digital audience of 100,000+ followers.

From their site
April 2020

Step 1:
Hone Your Vision

Tell us about your goals, ideas, and the stage of your project. From our proprietary database, we’ll recommend some existing projects and top-read articles for inspiration. Then, we’ve made it easy for you to share and get feedback on your big vision.

Step 2:
Build Your Plan

Realistic data is the key to developing a feasible urban farming business plan. We’ve taken our years of experience doing just that and boiled it down to a few key decisions that we’ll walk you through. Then, access and update your plan from anywhere for the next 180 days.

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April 15, 2020   Comments Off on Agritecture Designer is the world’s first digital platform for urban agriculture planning

Opal’s Farm Launches To Bring Produce To Fort Worth’s Food Deserts

92 year old Opal Lee cuts the ribbon to mark the beginning of Opal’s Farm.
Credit Paul Cline For Kera News

Some of the produce will be sold at a farmer’s market and to local chefs. The rest will be given away.

By Christopher Connelly
KeraNews
Feb 14, 2019

Excerpt:

Right now, Opal’s Farm is a couple acres of freshly turned dirt next to the Trinity River, ready for planting beds to be built and seeds to be sown.

Across the river, downtown skyscrapers loom, but that abundance seems to stop at the water. This United Riverside neighborhood is one of many Tarrant County communities designated as food deserts where fresh, unprocessed foods are hard to come by.

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February 24, 2019   Comments Off on Opal’s Farm Launches To Bring Produce To Fort Worth’s Food Deserts

Community gardens across Houston work to end food deserts’ thirst

Icet is an urban farmer who has been managing numerous garden and agriculture projects over the course of 18 years in the Third and Fifth Wards.

Eastern Houston has more than 30 neighborhoods that may classify as food deserts.

By Dana C. Jones
The Daily Cougar
January 24, 2018

Excerpt:

According to the Foreign Agricultural Service section of the USDA, the highest producers of world commodities like grain, corn and rice come from Mexico and countries in Africa and Central America. According to the Migration Policy Institute, more than one fifth of Houston metro residents are foreign-born and ranked fifth for largest immigrant population and third for immigrants coming from Mexico and Honduras.

“We have a sizable group of immigrants from Africa who are some of the most skilled farmers in the world,” Icet said. “If we take that diversity and took seed from different cultures, we could create an awesome urban agriculture in the city.”

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January 30, 2018   Comments Off on Community gardens across Houston work to end food deserts’ thirst

Why it’s important for black farmers to take the lead on Detroit’s urban farms

Oakland Avenue Urban Farm. Photo by Tom Perkins.

What black organizations like Neighborhood B.U.G. and their allies are trying to do is, in part, restore ownership for a heritage of farming and gardening that never went away, but was overlooked, perhaps even within the community itself.

By Brian Allnutt
Detroit Metro Times
June 14, 2017

Excerpt:

Thorpe from Neighborhood B.U.G. says that the perception of his organization really changed when people realized it was being run by African-Americans. “In the beginning we had a couple of problems because people didn’t know who we were,” he says. “They thought we were probably a white organization. … Now we don’t have anything locked up, we don’t have any fences. … The community is just receptive because they see nothing but blacks, young black people out there gardening and it makes people stop, from old to young.”

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June 19, 2017   Comments Off on Why it’s important for black farmers to take the lead on Detroit’s urban farms

Urban farming in suburban Phoenix becomes the basis for an entire community hub

Click on image for larger file. An 18-acre site in South Phoenix with spaces for farming, gardening, education and community.

DSGN AGNC’s Spaces Of Opportunity, an 18-acre site in South Phoenix, Arizona, that is much more than just a place for growing: It’s also a community hub, an art center, and a music venue.

By Sam Lubell
The Architect’s Newspaper
January 24, 2017

Excerpt:

“The idea is that farming here is an excuse to bring services to this area,” said DSGN AGNC principal and founder Quilian Riano. “A way to bring economic opportunity.”

The semi-suburban area is home primarily to low- and middle-income Latino and African American populations. It’s also the site of a food desert, meaning that fresh food is very difficult to find. “There are more liquor stores than grocery stores here,” noted Riano.

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February 2, 2017   Comments Off on Urban farming in suburban Phoenix becomes the basis for an entire community hub

Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land

hotter

Lessons from Desert Farmers on Adapting to Climate Uncertainty

By Gary Paul Nabhan
Chelsea Green
2015

Excerpt from publisher:

With climatic uncertainty now “the new normal,” many farmers, gardeners, and orchardists in North America are desperately seeking ways to adapt how they grow food in the face of climate change. The solutions may be at our back door.

In Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land, Nabhan, one of the world’s experts on the agricultural traditions of arid lands, draws from the knowledge of traditional farmers in the Gobi Desert, the Arabian Peninsula, the Sahara Desert, and Andalusia, as well as the Sonoran, Chihuahuan, and Painted deserts of North America to offer time-tried strategies, including:

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February 5, 2015   Comments Off on Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land