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Category — Water – Greywater

Innovative Houston urban farm scores national award for green work

Moonflower Farms grows lettuce hydroponically. Courtesy of Moonflower Farms

Moonflower introduced a SupaGreens subscription box that allows customers to purchase greens weekly, bimonthly, or monthly.

By Eric Sandler
Culture Map
Dec 2, 2020,

Excerpt:

Located in a 20,000-square-foot greenhouse south of downtown, Moonflower operates what it describes as Houston’s first vertical indoor farm. The method both reduces the amount of space needed to grow the farm’s microgreens, lettuces, herbs and edible flowers and it eliminates the disruptions caused by adverse weather conditions, which allows the farm to produce year round.

Moonflower uses a closed-loop system for capturing rainwater to feed its crops. The water is treated and oxygenated so that it can be reused. Not having to pay for water from the City of Houston allows the farm to operate more economically and sell its produce at an affordable price to restaurants and individuals.

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December 8, 2020   Comments Off on Innovative Houston urban farm scores national award for green work

City revises fire hydrant policy that drained urban gardens in Chicago

Advocates for Urban Agriculture also launched a grant to help gardens pay for tapping into hydrants under the new policy

By Pascal Sabino
Austin Weekly News
July 28th, 2020

Excerpt:

Community gardens and urban farms might have an easier time getting the water they need after the city changed its fire hydrant policy.

The mid-summer changes reduce some of the barriers that have prevented many urban growers from using city water for much of the season.

The previous rules, introduced in the winter, made it so community gardens were required to pay hundreds of dollars for the equipment and installation necessary to apply for a permit to tap into the hydrants.

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August 2, 2020   Comments Off on City revises fire hydrant policy that drained urban gardens in Chicago

How Urban Farming With Hydroponics Can Help Feed the World While Saving Water

The ability of Gotham Greens to use up to 95% less water than traditional farms do in producing some of its food ranks the company on the highest end of the spectrum of water conservation across the urban agriculture industry.

By Michael Stahl
Weather Channel
Oct 8, 2019

Excerpt:

In order for the world’s food producers to keep up with a growing population’s food demands, they’ll have to increase agricultural development one way or another. If the status quo is maintained, the required boost in agriculture production could generate a 15% uptick in freshwater use. But the earth’s supply of freshwater — about 70% of which is already utilized by global agriculture — is under threat, due in part to global warming. Higher temperatures create a host of problems for the world’s water system, including faster evaporation, the disappearance of inland glaciers that feed freshwater supplies, and more extreme weather events that contribute to greater freshwater runoff.

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October 13, 2019   Comments Off on How Urban Farming With Hydroponics Can Help Feed the World While Saving Water

Africa: Resource Flows and Technology Adoption in Tamale, Ghana: Implications for Urban and Peri-Urban Vegetable Growers

Women who traditionally could not access land except through a male member of kin now have not only access but rights to land in irrigation sites.

By Eileen Bogweh Nchanji
Georg-August University of Göttingen
2018

Abstract:

Vegetable farming in Ghana`s urban areas is mostly a sustainable livelihood strategy. Alt- hough it is considered a means of survival for the poor, vegetable farming is practiced by urban dwellers across the income spectrum. As poverty and urban population increase, so is the need to supplement income with privately cultivated foodstuff.

In Ghana’s Northern Regional capital of Tamale, vegetable farming is constrained by a number of factors including land availability, land tenure security, and access to water. As a result, many vegetable farmers have resorted to cultivating lands along streams and canals, dugouts, wells, broken sewers, and reservoirs.

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July 23, 2019   Comments Off on Africa: Resource Flows and Technology Adoption in Tamale, Ghana: Implications for Urban and Peri-Urban Vegetable Growers

Community gardens fear their efforts will wilt under city’s new water rates

Tenant Farm, 1935/42, Anne Michalov.

While Columbia’s community gardens could be spared the more drastic rate hikes, home gardeners won’t get the same reprieve.

By Tynan Stewart
Missourian
Jan 29, 2019

Excerpt:

On Jan. 22, the Columbia City Council voted to restructure the city’s water rate system. The changes raised rates for all residents but especially for those who use a lot of water in the summer, including community gardens like the one at Broadway Christian. It’s one of about 30 that are part of the Community Garden Coalition, which provides support for community gardens in Columbia and Boone County.

While the city is working on a plan to exempt the gardens, the new summer rates have the coalition worried.

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February 4, 2019   Comments Off on Community gardens fear their efforts will wilt under city’s new water rates

Urban gardeners use big ag techniques to conserve soil

According to some estimates, “an acre of soil can store 27,000 gallons of storm water,”

By Emily Hopkins
Indianapolis Star
Sept. 4, 2018

Excerpt:

Gardeners working a plot at St. Alban’s Episcopal Church on the near east side are part of a group of urban growers who plant cover crops in the off season, a conservation technique more common to rural agricultural settings.

The garden produces thousands of pounds of food for local food pantries.

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September 16, 2018   Comments Off on Urban gardeners use big ag techniques to conserve soil

UK: Is this the last green lawn in Britain? His pride and joy during searing heatwave

He spends up to four hours a day watering to keep garden in tiptop condition

By Shari Miller
Mailonline
5 August 2018

Excerpt:

As he battles searing temperatures and one of the hottest summers in the UK on record, the holder of Britain’s best lawn title says he has ‘no intention’ of seeing his ‘pride and joy be ruined.’

Green-fingered gardener Stuart Grindle, 75, says he will keep working hard to stop his prized labour of love burning to a crisp as the nation sizzles.

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August 10, 2018   Comments Off on UK: Is this the last green lawn in Britain? His pride and joy during searing heatwave