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Category — Women

Amanda Weaver’s Ruminants Assist in Urban Farm Research

Weaver created the certificate program in sustainable urban agriculture within the Geography & Environmental Studies Department where she teaches. CU Denver GES students can use her farm as a field study location to conduct research.

By Alicita Rodriguez
CU Denver
University Communications
Dec 15, 2020

Excerpt:

Because of Weaver’s interest in the subject and her desire to keep the farm’s agricultural roots intact, Louise agreed to sell her the property, and she generously allowed Weaver to purchase it in installments. Now called Five Fridges Farm, the 13-acre property includes a farmhouse, commercial kitchen, and multiple barns, as well as open space bordering Lena Gulch.

Weaver found herself in a quandary: She was getting her doctoral degree in geography and had little practical knowledge of agricultural work. In fact, at age 40, she was what the industry calls a “Young Farmer.” She would need to figure out what to farm and how to do it. And she wanted to use the farm as a community resource and educational opportunity.

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December 19, 2020   Comments Off on Amanda Weaver’s Ruminants Assist in Urban Farm Research

Africa: Urban female farmers defeat hunger in Zimbabwe

“It is all because they see their men struggling to make both ends meet that women in cities and towns here occupied available land spaces to plant crops to supplement their domestic food needs,”

By Jeffrey Moyo
AA
12.12.2020

Excerpt:

Over the past one decade female farmers in landlocked southern African country Zimbabwe’s urban landscape are not only bridging gaps in food security but bringing additional incomes to their families.

When Denis Chihota, working as a messenger in one of the government departments in the capital Harare, was unable to earn enough to attend to the family with six children, his 47-year-old wife Madeline ventured into farming.

Even as growing crops in the middle of cities remains illegal, Madeline has harvested four tons of maize on the patches of land around her home, despite rough weather and little rain this year. She says that her endeavor in farming not only defeated hunger but has also supplemented the income of her family.

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December 17, 2020   Comments Off on Africa: Urban female farmers defeat hunger in Zimbabwe

UK: Have men finally lost the plot? Why female-owned allotments are booming

Turn over a new leaf: Rekha Mistry has a blog and Instagram account at rekhagarden kitchen.com CREDIT: Heathcliff O’Malley

Times have changed at Britain’s allotments, as women take to fresh air therapy and growing veg

By Matthew Appleby
The Telegraph
9 November 2020

Excerpt:

Dr Tilly Collins and fellow researcher Ellen Fletcher have found 63.7 per cent of London’s much in-demand allotments are rented by women. And the National Allotment Society estimates that half of all holders nationally are female, compared with 20 per cent in 2003 and 2 per cent in 1973, when the grow-your-own boom began.

Dr Collins believes that a major reason behind the female takeover is because many men have lost their place in society: “There’s a decline in pubs, an increase in divorce rates and more men are socially disconnected.

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November 15, 2020   Comments Off on UK: Have men finally lost the plot? Why female-owned allotments are booming

Self-Taught Buffalo Farmer Works Hard for Her Community

She was integral in helping to create a customer insurance document called the Greater Buffalo Urban Growers Pledge.

By Katherine Chloé
Spectrum News
Sept 09, 2020

Excerpt:

In Buffalo, Mayda Pozantides, a self-taught female farmer, works up to 12 hours a day, seven days a week.

“I wake up every morning and work hard, because I feel like what I’m doing is important for my community and the planet,” says Pozantides, Groundwork Market Garden owner.

Pozantides spends her days planting, weeding, and harvesting. Despite all of the work, becoming a farmer is something that Pozantides has never regretted.

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September 13, 2020   Comments Off on Self-Taught Buffalo Farmer Works Hard for Her Community

Farming the Saltless Sea: Duluth woman launches urban farm in Lincoln Park

Starr Brainard uses a fork to harvest chamomile on her Lincoln Park urban farm, Saltless Sea. Along with edible flowers, she grows kale, microgreens, chard, ground cherries, husk cherries, purple and traditional basil. (Tyler Schank)

Saltless Sea farm is about a half acre in a dense residential neighborhood below Lincoln Park Middle School. “This was almost entirely wasteland when I moved here,” Starr Brainard said.

By Melinda Lavine
Duluth News Tribune
Aug 8th 2020

Excerpt:

Starr Brainard plucked tiny, white chamomile flowers off green stems with a fork.

Nearby, other edible flowers — borage, Johnny-jump-ups and calendula — stood, ready for harvest on Brainard’s urban farm.

Saltless Sea is about a half acre in a dense residential neighborhood, behind a big, barren field right below Lincoln Park Middle School. “This was almost entirely wasteland when I moved here,” Brainard said, standing in her backyard farm.

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August 15, 2020   Comments Off on Farming the Saltless Sea: Duluth woman launches urban farm in Lincoln Park

Black urban farmers in the U.S. sow seeds to end ‘food apartheid’

Penniman, who opened Soul Fire Farm in 2010, lived in a “food desert” in the south of Albany, New York, recalling how hard it was to find fruit and vegetables for her young family as they did not own a car and there was no bus service.

By Thin Lei Win
Reuters
July 29, 2020

Excerpt:

Leah Penniman, co-director of Soul Fire Farm, an urban growing collective based in Petersburg, New York, said the fall in the number of Black farmers reflected decades of discrimination and a backlash over an estimated 16 million acres (6.5 million hectares) of land they owned in 1910.

“Racism and white supremacy are really built into the DNA of the U.S. food system,” said Penniman, author of a book called “Farming While Black”.

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August 3, 2020   Comments Off on Black urban farmers in the U.S. sow seeds to end ‘food apartheid’

Urban Agriculture Magazine, Gender in Urban Food Systems

A Call for Transformative Actions on Gender and Inequality

By RUAF
Issue No. 37
July 2020

Excerpt:

It’s no secret that the food system has an endemic gender problem. There are significant barriers to participation in food value chains due to socially determined identities, roles, rights and obligations of women and men, and structural inequalities embedded in the system.

Most work to address gender inequalities in the food system to date has focused on rural areas, with a particular focus on women producers. But there are vast gendered disparities in urban food systems too, which have been largely neglected by city officials, economic planners and development practitioners.

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July 29, 2020   Comments Off on Urban Agriculture Magazine, Gender in Urban Food Systems