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Denmark: A wind-powered vertical farm: Giant urban farm opens in Denmark

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Inside a warehouse in an industrial zone in Copenhagen vast stacks of plants soar almost to the ceiling. In time, this newly opened vertical farm will be one of the largest in Europe, while power from Denmark’s windfarms will ensure it is carbon-neutral, according to the company behind it.

Video by Sam Ball
France 24
Dec 7, 2020

Excerpt:

Though they will never see daylight or soil, hundreds of tonnes of lettuce, herbs and kale will be harvested over the coming months from the vast farm, run by Danish start-up Nordic Harvest.

“We have only an output of about 200 tonnes per year but we have built the support facility to support a production of 1,000 tonnes per year,” CEO Anders Riemann told AFP.

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December 13, 2020   Comments Off on Denmark: A wind-powered vertical farm: Giant urban farm opens in Denmark

India: Urban Agriculture

Indian is blessed in one way……we don’t import food from outside, unlike Gulf countries where the population depends entirely on food imports.

By D Chandrasekharam
Times of India
Dec 7, 2020

Excerpt:

UA As the name implies, farming within the urban area. With a growing population, the land-use pattern is compelling the population to adopt this method for food security. The sustainability of UA is through the network within communities. During the past year, during the COVID period, UA has increased its importance. Besides vegetables, the domain is expanding to bee-keeping and horticulture as well. In mega-cities like Mumbai UA is creeping into peri-urban areas also. Nearly 30% of the urban population is engaged in UA activity who are actively involved in the food for sale business.

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December 13, 2020   Comments Off on India: Urban Agriculture

Canada: Food prices are set to rise in 2021 — and farmers, food-insecure people will take a hit

Above, the blue area represents Canadian total farm sales, while the green represents Canadian farms’ net income. The discrepancy between the two originates in a mismatch between farmers’ costs of production and the price they receive for their products — prices set by Canada’s grocery chains. Graph by Darrin Qualman/National Farmers Union.

“We need a whole system change where we improve people’s income so they can afford to pay higher food prices that actually reflect the true cost of production — including social, health and ecological externalities.”

By Marc Fawcett-Atkinson
National Observer
December 7th 2020

Excerpt:

A Canadian family of four can expect to spend almost $700 more on food next year, according to a report released Tuesday. That’s about a five per cent increase compared to 2020.

The annual study, a collaboration between food researchers at four universities now in its 11th year, uses economic data, observed market trends and AI to predict food prices. Their analysis shows that meat, baked goods and vegetables will likely see the greatest increases, reflecting the pandemic-related challenges — from COVID-19 outbreaks in processing plants to low oil prices — that have faced Canada’s still-resilient food supply chain this year.

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December 13, 2020   Comments Off on Canada: Food prices are set to rise in 2021 — and farmers, food-insecure people will take a hit