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Canada: Nelson will use unique technology to reduce composting costs

Nelson City Hall staff person Sandy Kobe with a FoodCycler used in a city staff room.

The start-up cost including purchase of 4,000 FoodCyclers and bins is expected to be about $1.1 million, with two-thirds to be paid for by a grant from CleanBC

By Bill Metcalfe
Nelson Star
Dec 9, 2020

Excerpt:

Households in Nelson will first treat their organic material with a FoodCycler, a kitchen counter-top unit that dehydrates food material.

Organic material from around the RDCK will be trucked to a new facility being constructed on an old landfill site near Salmo.

According to the city, taking the water out of the organic material before it is picked up at curbside will mean “not trucking water around,” because the volume and weight of the waste will be significantly reduced. This will result in fewer curbside collections per year, lower transportation costs, and fewer greenhouse gases.

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January 19, 2021   Comments Off on Canada: Nelson will use unique technology to reduce composting costs

Philly growers spoke out. The result is an ‘anti-racist lens’ for city’s first agricultural plan

Kirtrina Baxter at work at her community farm in North Philadelphia. (Provided)

In March, Parks and Rec declared gardens “essential and life-sustaining,” so that they could operate during the COVID-19 shutdown.

By Catalina Jaramillo
Why PBS
January 13, 2021

Excerpt:

In March, Parks and Rec declared gardens “essential and life-sustaining,” so that they could operate during the COVID-19 shutdown. The department also created guidelines and support for community gardens and farmers markets to operate safely, and for gardeners to get access to the organic recycling center. It raised about $385,000 to get face masks, gloves, and other protective equipment to gardens, farms, farmers markets, and all food workers, and established PPE hubs for gardeners to collect them.

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January 19, 2021   Comments Off on Philly growers spoke out. The result is an ‘anti-racist lens’ for city’s first agricultural plan

Netherlands: I call myself a metropolitan farmer.

Rob Baan, Koppert Cress, The Netherlands

By Ruud Sies (photographer) and partner Hanneke van Hintum (producer)
Resilience Food Stories
2020

Excerpt:

As a small boy Rob was often taken by his father on walks through the woods or the dunes, where he learnt which plants were edible, and where they shot rabbits. That was how his father had survived the war.

Rob therefore came to see nature as a friend and he began to love plants. When during his studies he found an internship at the seed company Sluis & Groot, all the knowledge he had built up fell into place. He was intrigued by what the people who worked there could tell from looking at a crop and what interested him most of all was the recognition of diseases in plants. He was fascinated to discover how many variables influence the health of a plant, including its roots, its leaves, the soil, its location and the conditions there.

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January 19, 2021   Comments Off on Netherlands: I call myself a metropolitan farmer.