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Category — Middle East

Bangladesh: Coronavirus and our food systems in the inner city of Dhaka

A Small-scale roof-top integrated goat farm (RIGF) approach

By Dr.Mohammed Habibur Rahman, Professor of Pathology and Owner/Director, The Blue Crescent Veterinary Hospital, Mirpur, Dhaka -1216, Bangladesh

Excerpt:

COVID-19 pandemic has put entire agri-food value chain of our nation along with the local food systems including inner city at risk of disruptions. Bangladesh is no exception and our government has been playing a major role and working hard in limiting the spread of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. However food security in the inner city could not have been addressed with the speed as it was required. Thus, an innovative idea has been advanced to mitigate disruptions to ensure healthy food supply to the city dwellers. In order to improve the food supply, a very specific way of roof-top farming was introduced using goats and poultry in the production chain without creating any public nuisance and or impact on the environment.

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January 28, 2021   Comments Off on Bangladesh: Coronavirus and our food systems in the inner city of Dhaka

UEL: For one year, this man is eating only what’s grown at Dubai’s Sustainable City

See video here.

“I hope this challenge is a catalyst for others to start taking control of where their food is grown, understand local food systems and to explore local production,” he says.

By Giovanni Prati
CNN
January 20, 2021

Excerpt:

Landscape architect Phil Dunn has taken on an ambitious challenge. For one year, he is basing his diet on food grown in his local community, in an effort to highlight the issues of food sustainability and food waste.

A resident of Dubai’s Sustainable City neighborhood, Dunn calls the experiment he began last November “The Sustainable Human Project.” “(It) is a combination between a personal challenge for my 49th birthday and a project exploring food security and urban farming,” he tells CNN.
Dunn — a Canadian national — plans to create a small-scale example of a circular economy — aiming to produce, consume and recycle locally. It’s made much easier by the fact that he lives in a community purpose-built to promote a sustainable lifestyle.

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January 27, 2021   Comments Off on UEL: For one year, this man is eating only what’s grown at Dubai’s Sustainable City

Egypt: Known for its ancient antiquities and sprawling temples, Luxor is becoming Egypt’s main hub for sun-drying tomatoes.

The drying industry has created jobs for residents of Luxor, especially for women (Amr Emam/MEE)

Tomato drying racks are spread out across the ancient city, particularly in its southern and western parts.

By Amr Emam
Middle East Eye
Jan 18, 2021

Excerpt:

The city, some 650km from Cairo, produces a third of Egypt’s tomato crop of eight million tonnes.

Mahmud Abdel Radi, a Ministry of Agriculture official responsible for overseeing tomato sun-drying projects in Luxor, described these projects as a “treasure trove” for farmers and others who live in the city.

These projects are opening vast opportunities for farmers and the residents’ says Mahmud Abdel Radi, Ministry of Agriculture.

“They are opening vast opportunities for farmers and the residents,” Abdel Radi told MEE.

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January 23, 2021   Comments Off on Egypt: Known for its ancient antiquities and sprawling temples, Luxor is becoming Egypt’s main hub for sun-drying tomatoes.

United Arab Emirates: Phil Dunn, A resident of the Sustainable city vowed to sustain himself for 365 days eating only food sourced in The Sustainable City Farm.

Community gardens and fish tanks: Dubai expat embarks on year-long project to eat ‘only local’

By Karen Ann Monsy
Khaleej Times
December 25, 2020

(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

Years ago, landscape architect Phil Dunn was involved in the design and construction of The Sustainable City in Dubai. Even back then, the Canadian expat intended for the landscape to have productive, not just aesthetic, value. Now, he’s putting it all to the test with a vow to sustain himself exclusively on food produced by his local community for the next 365 days.

The Sustainable Human Project — conceived during the lockdown when food security issues were at the fore of public conversation — will see Phil growing his own fruits and vegetables in community garden plots. “Currently, I’ve got eggplants, moringa, sweet potato leaves, garlic, lettuce, and chillies,” says Phil. “It’s going to be a mainly vegetarian diet, but once a week, I’ll do a little fishing in the aquaponic tank we have here for some fish too.”

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December 26, 2020   Comments Off on United Arab Emirates: Phil Dunn, A resident of the Sustainable city vowed to sustain himself for 365 days eating only food sourced in The Sustainable City Farm.

United Arab Emirates: Why Have High-Rise Balcony Gardens Become A Hot Trend In Dubai?

Kris Ang Marteja and her garden.Kris Ang Marteja

UAE citizens are urban farmers in the making, despite having regular full-time jobs.

Excerpt:

The UAE imports almost all of the food it consumes. Around 90 per cent of the food consumed in Dubai has come from a far, clocking up a lot of food miles.

Fresh produce comes from places like India, Iran, Lebanon, North and South America, Europe, Africa, New Zealand, UK, and Egypt.

As a result, the UAE is keen to develop more solutions for crop production at home. Especially in the desert – an area that struggles with issues of food insecurity.

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December 18, 2020   Comments Off on United Arab Emirates: Why Have High-Rise Balcony Gardens Become A Hot Trend In Dubai?

Israel: You’ve got kale: Grocery chain to sell salad leaves, herbs grown on ‘green wall’

A Vertical Field container stationed at the Tel Aviv port (Courtesy)

Vertical Field has signed ‘multi-million dollar’ deal with Rami Levy supermarkets to offer customers fresh produce picked from vertical farms

By Shoshanna Solomon
The Times of Israel
13 December 2020

Excerpt:

The crops, which include lettuce, basil, parsley, kale and mint, will be sold daily, directly to clients after harvest, “at competitive prices,” the statement added.

The walls will be in containers stationed outdoors, on the premises of the supermarkets. Customers will be able to buy the produce on the spot from a seller who will pick the produce from the container and hand it over, with payment happening on the spot.

Customers will also have the option of purchasing the produce with the soil bedding that it was grown in, “allowing the customers to enjoy all the nutritional benefits of a freshly harvested crop and a longer shelf life,” the statement said.

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December 16, 2020   Comments Off on Israel: You’ve got kale: Grocery chain to sell salad leaves, herbs grown on ‘green wall’

Israeli supermarket employs vertical farm start-up for selling produce

A Vertical Field “Urban Farm” uses BIOLED eco-lighting technology to grow produce for a Rami Levy supermarket in Bnei Brak.

The new technologies eliminate the need to rely on outdoor growers and suppliers while also providing a fresher, more eco-friendly product which needs much less water and land to grow.

By Idan Zonshine
The Jerusalem Post
November 24, 2020

Excerpt:

Rami Levy, one of Israel’s largest supermarket chains, has been cooperating with two Israeli agri-tech start-ups to erect large containers to grow fruit and vegetables, which will be sold in the chain’s stores.

Vertical Field, a Ra’anana based agri-tech start-up which creates vertical, urban farms using geoponic technology, agricultural expertise and smart design, teamed up with BIOLED, a Tzuba-based eco-lighting start-up that uses LED lights to create more sustainable, profitable crops in order to erect the growing containers.

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December 1, 2020   Comments Off on Israeli supermarket employs vertical farm start-up for selling produce