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Category — Vertical Farm

Belgium: Brussels Most Impressive Indoor Vertical Farm.

Taste The Future Of Farming. In The Cellars Of An Old Brewery!

Hort Daily
Feb 25, 2021

Excerpt:

Microflavour Brussels cultivate in the cellars of the former Belle-Vue brewery in Molenbeek Brussels. This is done vertically to be able to produce more on a small surface. The agriculture of the future is more efficient and consumes less resources. By placing different levels on top of each other and by using vacant places in the city.

Everything grows in a controlled environment that does not depend on the vagaries of the climate. These are young vegetable shoots and herbs known as coriander, broccoli, peas, etc. They have a much higher nutritional value than the mature varieties because they store all the energy.

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March 2, 2021   No Comments

Canada: The future of the food supply chain lives on a rooftop in Montreal

Inside VSL (a reference to Ville St-Laurent, the district in which the farm is located); it’s the company’s newest greenhouse, and it sits atop a former Sears warehouse.

“Our objective at Lufa is to get to the point where we’re feeding everyone in the city,” Hage says.

By Tracey Lindeman
Fortune
February 6, 2021

Excerpt:

The world’s biggest commercial rooftop greenhouse sits atop a former Sears warehouse in a semi-industrial northwestern quarter of Montreal. Early every morning, staff pick fresh vegetables, then bring them downstairs, where they get packed into heavy-duty plastic totes along with the rest of the day’s grocery orders.

Tablets loaded with custom pick-and-pack software tell them where to put what: This basket has lettuce, tomatoes, and cucumbers, plus some chicken, eggs, and milk. The next one has eggplant, cashew Parmesan, tomato sauce, fresh pasta, and vegan ground round crumble. Whatever Lufa doesn’t grow in its four greenhouses comes from local farms and producers, mostly from within 100 miles.

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February 10, 2021   Comments Off on Canada: The future of the food supply chain lives on a rooftop in Montreal

Martha Stewart-backed indoor farm starts shipping tomatoes

This photo provided by AppHarvest shows tomatoes being grown at their facility in Morehead, Kentucky.

AppHarvest says its Morehead greenhouse, which houses 720,000 tomato plants over the equivalent of 45 football fields, is one of the largest single-story buildings in the world.

By Dee-Ann Durbin
Agri News
February 04, 2021

Excerpt:

Greenhouses have been around for decades, but not until recently have they grown into such large-scale facilities. At the same time, consumers are increasingly looking for better-tasting, sustainably produced food, Stewart said.

AppHarvest uses no chemical pesticides and says its tomatoes are bred for flavor, not long-haul travel, unlike tomatoes grown in Mexico.

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February 9, 2021   Comments Off on Martha Stewart-backed indoor farm starts shipping tomatoes

UK: Watch as we take you inside Baltic Triangle’s underground urban farm, Greens for Good

Urban is a vertical farm and eco-friendly project based in Liverpool’s Baltic Triangle.

The Guide Liverpool
Feb 2, 2021

Using cutting-edge hydroponic technologies, the team grow their greens in space-saving vertical towers in the heart of Liverpool.
Greens For Good is a campaign/project that aims to encourage people across Liverpool City Region to eat healthier, and shop healthier too. The produce that is grown at Greens For Good is grown for taste, not transport: living leaves, delivered by bicycle, in reusable and compostable packaging.

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February 7, 2021   Comments Off on UK: Watch as we take you inside Baltic Triangle’s underground urban farm, Greens for Good

Denmark: Construction of Europe’s largest vertical farm is underway

Nordic Harvest Vertical Farm. Construction began in April 2020, and the farm is a collaborative project between Nordic Harvest and YesHealth Group.

Europe’s largest vertical farm at 14 stories high in a 7,000-square-meter facility

Written by Katherine Gallagher
Inhabitat
Jan 26, 2021

Excerpt:

The first phase of construction on the new Nordic Harvest vertical farm has been completed after just 6 months of work. Once finished, the facility will become Europe’s largest vertical farm at 14 stories high in a 7,000-square-meter facility at Copenhagen Markets in Denmark.

Featuring proprietary technologies from YesHealth Group, a company that operates vertical farms across Asia and Europe, the Nordic Harvest farm will highlight robotics, hydroponics and more than 20,000 LED lights. The vertical farm will also feature smart software for processing over 5,000 individual data points that are all integrated with Nordic Harvest’s design of process flow and packaging.

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February 1, 2021   Comments Off on Denmark: Construction of Europe’s largest vertical farm is underway

Redefining locally grown produce with urban farming

Infarm has deployed more than 1000 farms in stores and distribution centers.

By Andy Nelson
Supermarket Perimeter
01.14.2021

Excerpt:

KANSAS CITY – Urban farms check a variety of boxes for today’s consumers: locally grown, sustainable, low carbon footprint — not to mention fresh, healthy and tasty.

And the COVID pandemic has only made them more attractive, as transportation and logistics created huge headaches for retailers, shippers and everyone in between along the supply chain. Kroger, Whole Foods Market and Safeway are just a few of the big-name US retailers to get on board.

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January 21, 2021   Comments Off on Redefining locally grown produce with urban farming

Netherlands: I call myself a metropolitan farmer.

Rob Baan, Koppert Cress, The Netherlands

By Ruud Sies (photographer) and partner Hanneke van Hintum (producer)
Resilience Food Stories
2020

Excerpt:

As a small boy Rob was often taken by his father on walks through the woods or the dunes, where he learnt which plants were edible, and where they shot rabbits. That was how his father had survived the war.

Rob therefore came to see nature as a friend and he began to love plants. When during his studies he found an internship at the seed company Sluis & Groot, all the knowledge he had built up fell into place. He was intrigued by what the people who worked there could tell from looking at a crop and what interested him most of all was the recognition of diseases in plants. He was fascinated to discover how many variables influence the health of a plant, including its roots, its leaves, the soil, its location and the conditions there.

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January 19, 2021   Comments Off on Netherlands: I call myself a metropolitan farmer.